The Small Business Frenzy

Recently, small business has become the answer to every question. How can we build the economy, create jobs and raise the standard of living? Small business! Why can’t we have paid sick days, family leave, minimum wage, pensions, job safety, environmental standards and fair taxes? Small business!  Indeed, Left or Right, good or bad, no proposal will fly if it can’t be proven to help small business.

Of course, small business is important. No one is going to come to your neighborhood and start a big business to employ thousands, unless it is the ghost of President Roosevelt with a self-financing, clean energy project like the Grand Coulee Dam.  But that would be big government and not allowed. So, can we rely on small business for job creation? There is a lot of fantasy about small business. Let’s consider the facts before we mortgage our future to it.

The Small Business Administration says “small” means under 500 employees. This can be a far cry from mom and pop stores, beauty parlors, restaurants, laundries and boutique clothing stores.  Two things matter regarding job creation and employment:  (1) age and (2) size.  It turns out that older and larger businesses create more new jobs and employ more people.  For example, 46% of all jobs and 37% of all new jobs are in businesses that are over ten years old with more than 500 employees. Compare this to 19% of jobs and 22% of new jobs in businesses under ten years old with fewer than 500 employees.[1]  To look at the extremes, 27% of all U.S. employees work for a business with a payroll of ten thousand people or more, while only 5% work for a business with one to four employees.[2]

Not only do larger businesses employ more people and create more jobs, they pay better. The average hourly worker at a company with 500 or more employees earns nearly twice the total compensation of a counterpart employed at a firm with fewer than 50 workers. That's $42.39 per hour, in wages, salaries, and benefits, as compared to just $22.96 for the smaller shop.[3]

But what are the trends? Are small businesses the long-term answer to getting and staying out of the economic hole? In noting that the average startup size of a new business is ten employees, a recent study of census data, finds a “potentially troubling trend.” [4]   Since the 1980s there has been a long-term decline in the pace of overall job creation in the United States. This reflects a decline in the rate of business startups which went from as high as 13% (of all businesses) in the 1980s to as low as 7% in recent years. A study of similar data by the Labor Department found that in the 2000s, new businesses started out smaller and stayed smaller. The authors suggest an economic shift in which “new establishments are entering the economy with new modes of production that place a greater emphasis on technology and a lesser emphasis on labor.”[5]  To round out the picture, consider the survival rate of new businesses.  Since 1977 only around 50% of the businesses started in any given year were still going five years later.[6]  Of the businesses started in the year 1992, only 29% lasted ten years.[7] 

Strangely, those who see small business as the economic engine also extol free market competition. They can’t have both. Competition means winners and losers, but unlike baseball, the losers in business don’t come back next season. Companies that are gone, are gone for good. Yes, there should be measures to help small businesses be more competitive, but they mainly compete with each other. While wish them well, let us not commit ourselves to a policy of low wages, low benefits and unstable employment in the belief that it will all improve in the future. For the most part, it won’t. 

It is true that a few small businesses win and become big businesses. It is also true that the economic tendency is for big businesses to become monopolies that shut out competition, but that is another story for another time.

All right then, what can we do?  These pages have often suggested the necessary direction. For example, imagine that Congress declared that in twenty years it would be illegal to burn fossil fuels.  Now imagine public/private partnerships to electrify the country with renewable energy, to remanufacture every car on the road, to change the heating system in every home and office, to reinsulate every building and construct three new high speed transcontinental railroads. That would be the economic equivalent of World War Two, with full employment, good union wages and fair profits for companies of all sizes.  But suppose the private sector won’t play? Well, the truth is that they really aren’t needed any more.  

Steve Max is a DSA Vice-Chair and member of the New York City DSA local. He is a founder of the Midwest Academy Organizing School.

DSA Queer Socialists Conference Call

May 25, 2017
· 33 rsvps

Join DSA's Queer Socialists Working Group to discuss possible activities for the group and its proposed structure. 9 pm ET/8 pm CT/7 pm MT/6 pm PT.

 

What Is DSA? Training Call

May 30, 2017
· 40 rsvps

If you're a new DSAer, have been on a new member call, but still have questions about DSA's core values/strategy/core work and how to express these ideas in an accessible way to the media, as well as to friends, family and others who might be interested in joining DSA, this call is for you. 

We will talk through the basics of DSA's political orientation and strategy for moving toward democratic socialism, and also have call participants practice discussing these issues with each other. By the end of the call you should feel much more comfortable thinking about and expressing what DSA does and what makes our organization/strategy unique. 8 pm ET; 7 pm CT; 6 pm MT; 5 pm PT. 70 minutes.

Film Discussion: Rosa [Luxemburg]

May 31, 2017
· 92 rsvps

Join DSA member Jason Schulman to discuss the film Rosa, directed by feminist filmmaker Margarethe von Trotta. View it here at no cost before the discussion. Marxist theorist and economist Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919) played a key role in German socialist politics. Jason edited Rosa Luxemburg: Her Life and Legacy and has a chapter in Rosa Remix. 9 ET/8 CT/7 MT/6 PT.

Film Discussion: The Free State of Jones

June 11, 2017
· 26 rsvps

Join Victoria Bynum, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History, Texas State University, San Marcos, to discuss The Free State of Jones. STX Entertainment bought the film rights to Bynum's book of the same title. She also served as a consultant and appears in a cameo scene. What was the Free State of Jones? During the Civil War, an armed band of deserters led by Newt Knight, a non-slaveholding white farmer, took to the swamps of southeastern Mississippi and battled against the Confederacy in an uprising popularly known as “The Free State of Jones.” Joining Newt in this rebellion was Rachel, a slave. From their relationship, there developed a controversial mixed-race community that endured long after the Civil War had ended. View the film here for $6 before the discussion. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Introduction to Democratic Socialism

June 13, 2017
· 5 rsvps

Join Bill Barclay, Chicago DSA co-chair, and Peg Strobel, National Political Committee and Feminist Working Group co-chair, on this webinar for an overview of what we in Democratic Socialists of America mean when we talk about "socialism," "capitalism" and the goals of the socialist movement. 9:30 PM ET; 8:30 PM CT; 7:30 PM MT; 6:30 PM PT.

  1. This webinar is free for any DSA member in good standing.
  2. You need a computer with good internet access.
  3. Your computer must have headphones (preferred) or speakers; you can speak thru a mic or use chat to "speak".
  4. If you have questions, contact Bill Barclay, chocolatehouse@sbcglobal.net.
  5. If you have technical questions, contact Tony Schmitt, schmittaj@gmail.com, 608-355-6568.

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 7 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 5 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.