Thanks, Pete

By Barbara Joye

Pete_Seeger.jpg 

Like many of you, I woke up this morning to the news of Pete Seeger’s death. As I read the many reviews of his life’s accomplishments and controversies that followed, I struggled to temper my sadness with thankfulness that I had been able to hear him in person a few times -- at my progressive high school during his blacklisted years; headlining a benefit for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (where he introduced a then unknown Phil Ochs); at the Highlander Center in Tennessee; and, just two years ago, co-hosting, with Harry Belafonte, a benefit for the American Indian political prisoner Leonard Peltier.

I missed the New York DSA event at which I am told he sang, as I had moved to Atlanta by then, but I met friends of his within weeks of arriving in my new city. His friends and followers were everywhere.

He touched my life, our lives, in so many ways that I was at a loss for words, so I turned to one of his old friends, Frank Hamilton, who lives and performs in Atlanta. Frank was briefly a member of the Weavers (1962-3) and together with Pete Seeger, Guy Carawan and Zilphia Horton arranged the civil rights version of “We Shall Overcome.” He and his wife and singing partner Mary Hamilton sent this tribute: 

"Pete was the guiding light behind the folk music movement, celebrating the possibility for social change, inspiring everyone with whom he came into contact; not just a great performer but an important educator and visionary who showed us that we can have a better world if we just plant the seeds for it in whatever seemingly small things we do.  His music will resonate around the globe, a model for what music can do as a powerful source of improvement for our ailing country.  Through his music, we understand what socialism means and its healing properties."

Barbara Joye is recording secretary of Metro Atlanta DSA and a member of DSA’s National Political Committee.

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership

DSA New Member Orientation Call

February 25, 2017
· 15 rsvps

You've joined DSA - Great. Now register for this New Member Orientation call and find out more about our politics and our vision.  And, most importantly, how you can become involved.  1 pm ET; 12 pm CT; 11 am MT; 10 am PT.  

What Is DSA? Training Call

March 07, 2017
· 50 rsvps

If you're a new DSAer, have been on a new member call, but still have questions about DSA's core values/strategy/core work and how to express these ideas in an accessible way to the media, as well as to friends, family and others who might be interested in joining DSA, this call is for you. 

We will talk through the basics of DSA's political orientation and strategy for moving toward democratic socialism, and also have call participants practice discussing these issues with each other. By the end of the call you should feel much more comfortable thinking about and expressing what DSA does and what makes our organization/strategy unique. 8 pm ET; 7 pm CT; 6 pm MT; 5 pm PT. 70 minutes.

Feminist Working Group

March 07, 2017
· 26 rsvps

People of all genders are welcome to join this call to discuss DSA's work on women's and LGBTQ issues, especially in light of the new political reality that we face after the elections.  9 pm ET; 8 pm CT; 7 pm MT; 6 pm PT.

LGBT Activism: A Brief History with Thoughts about the Future

April 01, 2017
· 13 rsvps

Historian John D'Emilio's presentation will do 3 things: Provide a brief explanation of how sexual and gender identities have emerged; provide an overview of the progression of LGBT activism since its origins in the 1950s, highlighting key moments of change; and, finally, suggest what issues, from a democratic socialist perspective, deserve prioritizing now. John co-authored Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America, which was quoted by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the 2003 Lawrence v. Texas decision that ruled state sodomy laws unconstitutional. 1 pm ET; 12 pm CT; 11 am MT; 10 am PT.

  1. This webinar is free for any DSA member in good standing.
  2. You need a computer with good internet access.
  3. Your computer must have headphones (preferred) or speakers; you can speak thru a mic or use chat to "speak".
  4. If you have questions, contact Peg Strobel, peg.strobel@sbcglobal.net.
  5. If you have technical questions, contact Tony Schmitt, schmittaj@gmail.com, 608-355-6568.

Film Discussion: Documentaries of People's History in Texas

April 02, 2017
· 21 rsvps

Join DSA members Glenn Scott and Richard Croxdale to discuss videos produced by People’s History in Texas (PHIT), a project that brings to life the stories of ordinary people in significant socio-political movements in Texas. They will discuss The Rag, their newest documentary, which tells the story of an influential underground paper based in Austin, Texas, from 1966-77. Click here to view Part I (the early years as an all-volunteer paper covering the student, anti-Vietnam and Civil Rights movements), Part II (the impact of Women’s Liberation on the paper) and Part III (building community: covering local politics, nukes, co-ops, feminist institutions). But also check out the video on the Stand-Ins about a group of university students who led a movement to desegregate Austin’s movie theaters in 1961. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.