Talkin’ Bernie and Socialism

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Portland DSA Collecting Signatures For Bernie

 

By Dustin Guastella

Scene I: You’ve set up your table. The Socialists for Sanders sign can be seen from ten feet away. You’re wearing a DSA T-shirt. The table is stocked with flyers on Bernie’s positions. The sign-up sheet is in front of you. You’re building DSA and Sanders’s campaign. Someone walks up to the table.

Scene II: You’re at a party and somebody notices your Sanders button or T-shirt. “He seems like a nice guy, but what does he stand for?” “I like his ideas, but I really want a woman president.” “He doesn’t have a chance.”

Linking Bernie’s campaign and our vision of democratic socialism requires real conversations with thousands of workers, students, and voters, many of whom have not heard of Bernie, his platform, or his call for political revolution.

So, what do you say after you say hello? First, listen to the person’s comments and questions, then put the message and the man together.

Link Bernie’s platform to a socialist analysis and a long-term vision of a radically democratic and egalitarian society. For instance, when we talk about Bernie’s commitment to tuition-free public higher education, we should explain why education is a fundamental social right, not a commodity sold to the highest bidder in order to get an edge in the global capitalist marketplace. Just as our country decided to make elementary and secondary education available to everyone, not just the wealthy, we can do the same for higher education, paid for by a financial transaction tax.

When we mention Bernie’s position on wealth redistribution, we make it clear that wealth itself is created by society as a whole and not by a class of capitalists.

You bring up easily relatable and popular key positions: “Bernie is the only candidate pushing for a $15 minimum wage,” “Bernie is the only candidate fighting for free healthcare for all,” and “Bernie is the only candidate pledging to expand the labor movement.” And then you explain why that matters. Bernie’s platform has many strong policy positions. We socialists need to bring the analysis that informs those policies to the foreground.

What if the person is already a “Sanderista” but didn’t even know that DSA existed? Schedule a time to sit down one-on-one and talk about how to make this political revolution a reality. First, find out where the person is coming from. Then, explain how Bernie’s goals and ours fit with their desire for a more equal and democratic future. Explain that we need a parallel social movement to complement Sanders’s electoral movement. If he’s elected, he’s going to need a strong movement behind him. And if he’s not elected the need for such a movement is even greater. Bernie himself has repeatedly stressed the need for increased social movement activity. His supporters need to know that it is not enough to vote for him and go home.

Without a strong socialist organization there can be no strong leftist movement. When you table and leaflet or wear a button or T-shirt, always introduce yourself as a member of DSA and invite enthusiastic Sanders supporters to talk with you at greater length or come to your next local meeting. DSA has been fighting for many of Bernie’s positions for nearly 40 years (way before it was cool!). DSA is training and developing the next generation of socialist leaders, activists, and organizers. If Sanders supporters want to continue this work after the campaign is over, they should see our organization as their political home. Democratic socialists should be front and center of the Sanderista political revolution, but we can only make that happen if we organize and speak up about socialism.

Dustin Guastella is a member of Philadelphia DSA and co-chair of the DSA We Need Bernie campaign. You can find DSA resources at www.dsausa.org/weneedbernie_organizing_materials.

This article originally appeared in the winter 2015 issue of the Democratic Left magazine.

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership. Democratic Left blog post submission guidelines can be found here.

Introduction to Democratic Socialism

July 06, 2017
· 49 rsvps

Join Rahel Biru, NYC DSA co-chair, and Joseph Schwartz, DSA Vice-Chair, on this webinar for an overview of what we in Democratic Socialists of America mean when we talk about "socialism," "capitalism" and the goals of the socialist movement.  8 PM ET; 7 PM CT; 6 PM MT; 5 PM PT.

  1. This webinar is free for any DSA member in good standing.
  2. You need a computer with good internet access.
  3. Your computer must have headphones (preferred) or speakers; you can speak thru a mic or use chat to "speak".
  4. If you have questions, contact Joseph Schwartz, schwartzjoem@gmail.com.
  5. If you have technical questions, contact Tony Schmitt, schmittaj@gmail.com, 608-355-6568.

DSA New Member Orientation Call

July 09, 2017
· 22 rsvps

You've joined DSA - Great. Now register for this New Member Orientation call and find out more about our politics and our vision.  And, most importantly, how you can become involved.  9 PM ET; 8 PM CT; 7 PM MT; 6 PM PT.

Running for the National Political Committee

July 11, 2017

Join this call to hear a presentation and ask questions about the role, duties and time commitment of a member of DSA's National Political Committee. In the meantime, check out the information already on our website about the NPC.

Feminist Working Group

July 12, 2017

People of all genders are welcome to join this call to discuss DSA's work on women's issues, especially in light of the new political reality that we face after the elections.  9 pm ET; 8 pm CT; 7 pm MT; 6 pm PT.

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 12 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 11 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.