September Jobs Report

Economy Still Stagnating; Wealth, Income Gap Still Widening

 By Luiz Diaz-Perez

wh-sept-jobs-2013.jpg 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics issued the September Employment Situation report on Oct. 22. This came 18 days after the scheduled Oct. 4 release because of the 15-day government shutdown. As expected, the September report portrays a stagnant economy, creating jobs barely at a pace commensurate with population growth and far from a rate that would reflect an economy on the road to recovery.

 Nonfarm employment increased by all of 148,000 jobs, a smidge below the 150,000 or so jobs commonly believed to be needed to keep pace with population growth. This rate was half of the 300,000 new jobs that should be created monthly in an economy working its way out of the doldrums. Unchanged was the number of Americans working part time who otherwise desire fulltime work: 7.9 million.

The official unemployment figure for the month was calculated at 7.2 percent, down from 7.3 percent in August. Both the labor force participation rate, 63.2 percent, and the employment-population ratio, 58.6 percent, were unchanged. Among the unemployed,  52.9 percent have been out of work 15 weeks or more, and 36.9 percent of the unemployed (4.1 million people) have been out of work 27 weeks or more.

 The number of people employed by the federal government fell by 6,000 in September, to 2.723 million, the lowest number of civilian employees since 1966. Since February 2010, the number of state, local and federal government jobs in the US fell by 590,000, led by a reduction of 344,000 jobs in local government. The federal government now employs only 2.0 percent of all employed people, down from 4.3 percent 47 years ago (http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/10/23/jobs-o23.html). In September, there was little change in the government employment figures. However, the shutdown forced our beleaguered federal workforce to take a financial hit. Nonetheless, the BLS report shows there were 22,000 new hires across state governments, a counterintuitive result in the context of diminishing public budgets.

 Employment in construction jumped by 20,000 and transit and ground passenger transportation added 18,000 jobs, perhaps as a result of the public’s increasing reliance on low-rate bus services. Healthcare added but 7,000 jobs.

 While the main elements of the September report arrived as expected, there were a couple of minor surprises. Professional and business services, which had been adding an average of 52,000 jobs per month over the preceding year, only added 32,000 positions in September. Employment in food service and drinking establishments dropped 7,000 jobs where previously there had been consistent growth in bartending and restaurant work. Last month’s drop may reflect both a reduction in summer hospitality work and the possibility that Americans just can’t afford to go out to eat as much as they had in the past.

 Another employment-oriented report, GMI Ratings’ annual poll of executive compensation, was issued the same week as the BLS report, offering more data for reflection. For the first time in the history of this annual study, none of the top 10 highest-earning CEOs made less than $100 million. GMI's poll of pay and other compensation for 2,259 US CEOs found an average rise of 8.47 percent in pay and other compensation. The top ten CEOs alone took home more than $4.7 billion between them, while the average pay package of an S&P 500 chief executive last year was $13.7 million. (http://www.theguardian.com/business/2013/oct/22/top-earning-ceos-100m-paychecks-record)

The GMI findings are consistent with the US’ widening wealth and income gap. The top one percent of incomes grew 31.4 percent while the bottom 99 percent of incomes grew only 0.4 percent from 2009 to 2012. From 2009 to 2012, average real income per family grew by six percent, according to UC Berkeley economist Emmanuel Saez. The top one percent captured 95 percent of the income gains in the first three years of the Lesser Depression (http://elsa.berkeley.edu/~saez/saez-UStopincomes-2012.pdf).

Luis Diaz-Perez is a Chicago writer interested in the struggle for social justice and Latin American affairs. Employment reports by the CPEG.

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership.

Grassroots Fundraising: Paying for the Revolution (9pm Eastern)

June 23, 2017
· 46 rsvps

Are you new to socialist organizing? Or after many years do you still struggle, raising money from members when you need it but without a steady flow of income or budget to plan ahead? Are you afraid to tackle fundraising because it seems so daunting or you are uncomfortable asking people for money?

In this webinar, you will learn why fundraising is organizing, and how to do it – face to face, through fundraising events, and other ideas.

Join us for our latest organizing training for democratic socialist activists: DSA’s (Virtual) Little Red Schoolhouse.

Instructor:

  • Steve Max, DSA Vice Chair and one of the founders of the legendary community organizing school, The Midwest Academy

Training Details:

  1. Workshops are free for any DSA member in good standing.
  2. You need a computer with good internet access.
  3. Your computer must have preferably headphones or else speakers; you can speak thru a mic or use chat to "speak".
  4. If you have questions, contact Theresa Alt talt@igc.org.
  5. If you have very technical questions, contact Tony Schmitt schmittaj@gmail.com 608-355-6568.
  6. Participation requires that you register at least 21 hours in advance -- by midnight Thursday for Friday's webinar.

NOTE: This training is scheduled for 9:00pm Eastern Time (8pm Central, 7pm Mountain, 6pm Pacific, 5 pm Alaska, 3 pm Hawaii).

Data Security for DSA Members

June 27, 2017

Ack! I googled myself and didn't like what I found!

WHAT: A DSA Webinar about "Doxing"
WHEN: 9PM EST, 6PM PST

We're proud of our organizing, and chapter work is transparent for both political and practical reasons. However, there are basic precautions you can take in this time of rapid DSA growth to protect your privacy.

Key Wiki is a website that meticulously documents DSA activity and posts it for the world to see. If you're an active DSA member, likely your name is on their website. This is an example of "doxing".

As DSA becomes larger, more visible, and more powerful, we might expect that more websites like this will pop up, and more of our members' information might be posted publicly on the web.

Join a live webinar on Tuesday, June 27 with data security expert Alison Macrina, to learn:

  1. what is doxing? with examples and ways to prevent it
  2. how to keep your passwords strong and your data secure
  3. where to find your personal info on the internet and how to get it removed
  4. social media best practices for DSA organizers
  5. what to do if you've already been doxed

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/9173276528

Call-in Info: +1 408 638 0968
Meeting ID: 917 327 6528

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 11 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 8 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.