Reflections on My Time in Ferguson

Ferguson.jpg

(Photo credit: Oluwafemi Agbabiaka; The sit-in took place at a Quik Trip in south St. Louis on October 13th, 2014).

By Femi Ogbabiaka,

Anyone who has participated in direct action can tell you that your first time is going to be scary, but it comes more naturally after that. When I went to Ferguson, MO along with some students from the University of Missouri-Columbia, I imagined that my past experience could help prepare me for any difficulties I might face there while protesting in the days leading up to the grand jury decision. I was completely wrong. The brutality and oppression that I witnessed and experienced there was far beyond anything that I had seen in other protests, and had a profound radicalizing effect on me. I’ve always had a relatively antagonistic view of police, but seeing officers beat protesters who were already handcuffed, use tear gas on peaceful protestors, and use riot gear against unarmed citizens changed that.

 

The definition of a reactionary is one who is opposed to political or social liberalization or reform. Any time oppressed peoples choose to rise up in defiance of the stranglehold that elites have on them and their communities, reactionaries come out in force. This has been true from the beginning of the labor movement, through the civil rights movement, and it will not change until true liberation has been achieved.

The winter has made it harder to maintain the mass numbers of protesters that we all witnessed in the fall, and reactionaries have responded with massive campaigns to attempt to sway public opinion. From New York to Oakland, police departments are cracking down and working hard to maintain their level of brutal force in communities of color. The only solution is to continue fighting back. I don’t mean this in an abstract sense, because as I write this, there are working class people who have died and will die by the hand of those who the capitalist class has led them to believe should protect them. Silence and inaction on this issue is complicity. If you have ever wondered what you would’ve done during the civil rights movement, now is your chance. If you deny the brutality of our police departments, go to a protest, they will prove how destructive they can be.

The final day we protested in St. Louis, the group I was with participated at a sit-in at a local gas station, where naturally, the St. Louis police showed up in riot gear, falsely accused a group of people with their hands in the air of throwing rocks, kettled, and then finally tear gassed us until we had to leave the premises, all the while being followed by more police banging on their riot shields. The atmosphere as we left under those circumstances was one of fear, but also of newfound awareness. Police response to peaceful protests is a microcosm of the everyday occupation of neighborhoods of color, and the fact that they’re cracking down as hard as they can means the protests are working. Bit by bit, the contradictions of these intertwined systems of white supremacy and capitalism rear their head, forcing elites to take notice, and as they do, the people grow stronger.

 

FemiAID.pngFemi Agbabiaka is a Young Democratic Socialists Coordinating Committee member who founded a YDS chapter at the University of Missouri-Columbia and is currently an active member with Chicago DSA

 

A Black History Month reflection.

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership. Democratic Left blog post submission guidelines can be found here.

 

 

 

Data Security for DSA Members

June 27, 2017

Ack! I googled myself and didn't like what I found!

WHAT: A DSA Webinar about "Doxing"
WHEN: 9PM EST, 6PM PST

We're proud of our organizing, and chapter work is transparent for both political and practical reasons. However, there are basic precautions you can take in this time of rapid DSA growth to protect your privacy.

Key Wiki is a website that meticulously documents DSA activity and posts it for the world to see. If you're an active DSA member, likely your name is on their website. This is an example of "doxing".

As DSA becomes larger, more visible, and more powerful, we might expect that more websites like this will pop up, and more of our members' information might be posted publicly on the web.

Join a live webinar on Tuesday, June 27 with data security expert Alison Macrina, to learn:

  1. what is doxing? with examples and ways to prevent it
  2. how to keep your passwords strong and your data secure
  3. where to find your personal info on the internet and how to get it removed
  4. social media best practices for DSA organizers
  5. what to do if you've already been doxed

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/9173276528

Call-in Info: +1 408 638 0968
Meeting ID: 917 327 6528

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 11 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 9 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.