Negotiators Reach "Deal" on TPP

Protest11-620xauto-1.jpg

Obama Administration negotiators have  announced an "agreement in principle" for the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP).  It is not final.  It may not pass Congress.  

The TPP is still secret and according to the terms in this year's fast-track legislation it will remain secret for 30 days after the president formally notifies Congress that he will sign it. That could be a while still, as the agreement's details need to be "ironed out." After that 30-day wait the full text has to be public for 60 days before Congress can vote. Expect a massive and massively funded corporate PR push.


 

By Paul Garver

Throughout the spring, liberal Democrats and some Tea Party Republicans, aided by a coalition of labor, environmental, and progressive groups, joined forces against a massive corporate power grab known as “Fast Track” Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) only to see it narrowly pass the House by a 218-208 vote in early June. TPA and the accompanying Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) bills were signed into law by President Barack Obama on June 29. 

 

Polls show that a majority of American voters oppose “trade deals” that endanger workers’ jobs and environmental regulations. But the political game is rigged. Fast Track Trade Promotion Authority, which allows U.S. trade representatives to negotiate agreements in secret (retroactively in the TPP case), is not really about “free trade.” Such authority would cement the current inequitable structure of the global economy by enacting three sweeping investor protection treaties (Trans Pacific Partnership [TPP], Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership [TTIP], and the Trade in Services Agreement [TISA]). Together these treaties would make it almost impossible for any political authority in any nation to enforce serious protections for workers, communities, or the environment. 

Capital plans to ensure perpetual corporate dominance through the Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) mechanism for enforcing these treaties. Corporations that claim losses in their expected profits as a result of any governmental action that protects a country’s citizens can sue for monetary damages by taking it to a private and secretive panel of corporate lawyers. However, labor, environmental, or consumer organizations have no direct access to ISDS. The rulings of ISDS panels cannot be challenged in any court. Corporate ISDS claims under previous trade treaties are already threatening governments with massive damages for environmental and consumer protection regulations. For instance, Philip Morris has sued the governments of Uruguay, Australia, and the United Kingdom because those countries require very clear warnings on cigarette packages.

The struggle against these treaties has led to a massive and coordinated global resistance. The “Alliance of Teamsters and Turtles,” prefigured in the 1999 Seattle demonstrations, is becoming an organized coalition capable of driving a deep wedge into the current U.S. two-party system. A key leader of this coalition, former CWA president Larry Cohen, citing Hillary Clinton’s belated and equivocal comments on Fast Track and the TPP, endorsed and will work for Bernie Sanders, a fierce opponent of these corporate-driven trade deals.

Top-secret TPP treaty provisions will become accessible to congressional scrutiny two months before the accelerated debate under Fast Track can begin in Congress. This minor but useful delay is the single concrete achievement of the opposition to date.

Movements in Europe are gaining traction against the TTIP. The struggles in the streets for racial justice, campaigns for improving the lot of low-income workers, for rescuing democracy from the stranglehold of money, for divesting universities from fossil fuel investments are rising...and converging. The comprehensive political revolution advocated by democratic socialist Bernie Sanders may not result in his winning the presidency, but its strong appeal to many activists reveals the deep hunger for genuine political change.

Paul Garver, a retired international union organizer, is a member of DSA’s National Political Committee and co-editor of Talking Union, DSA’s labor network blog (talkingunion.wordpress.com), where you can follow trade issues as they unfold. Talking Union is on the left side of this page.


 

This article originally appeared in the fall 2015 issue of the Democratic Left magazine.

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership. Democratic Left blog post submission guidelines can be found here.

 

 

Talking About Socialism: Create Your Own Rap

April 26, 2018

8pm ET/7pm CT/6pm MT/5pm PST

Click HERE to RSVP

Join Steve Max, a founder of the legendary community organizing school, the Midwest Academy, to practice talking about socialism in plain language. Create your own short rap. Use your personal experience and story to explain democratic socialism. Prepare for those conversations about socialism that happen when you table or canvass. This workshop is for those who have already had an introduction to democratic socialism, whether from DSA's webinar or from other sources. Questions? Contact Theresa Alt <talt@igc.org> 607-280-7649.

Click HERE to RSVP

Medicare For All: Women and Health Webinar

May 02, 2018

Wednesday, May 2, 2018 9pm ET/ 8pm CT/ 7pm MT/ 6pm PT

RSVP

Women are the major users of health care, both for themselves and for their children and often their parents. Women are also the majority of health care providers, as nurses, home health care workers and often as unpaid providers for elderly relatives. What are the specific concerns for women related to health and how can we organize to address them? What does this mean for our Medicare for All campaign? Join panelists Natalie Shure, Megan Svoboda and Amy Zachmeyer, and National Director Maria Svart to discuss socialist feminist approaches to Medicare for All.

RSVP

New Member Call, May 27

May 27, 2018

May 27, 2018

9pm ET/8 CT/7 MT/6 PT

Click to RSVP

You've joined DSA - Great! Now register for this New Member Orientation call and find out more about our politics and our vision. And, most importantly, how you can become involved.

Questions or Comments? Contact: 

Sam M