Heighten the Contradictions Around Food Stamps

We’re angry. We bet you are too. Two weeks ago, roughly 47 million people, nearly half of them children, lost part of their food stamp (SNAP) benefits. Apparently the average allocation of $1.40 per person per meal is too generous for the “lazy moochers” that the Right-wing characterizes as anyone who needs a helping hand, even five years into the greatest recession to hit this country since the Great Depression.

As if this first round of cuts wasn’t enough, funding for food stamps is yet again on the chopping block this week as Congress attempts to pass a final Farm Bill. The choice seems to be cutting $4 billion or cutting $40 billion. We’re talking about taking food stamps away from 3.8 million people with 1.5 billion lost meals for struggling families, in the first year alone.

Take action right now to demand a third option – NO CUTS TO FOOD STAMPS! Check the list of Senators and Representatives on the committee and call the Capitol switchboard to reach their offices: (202) 224-3121.


Do you boil over about the contradiction of “family values” politicians taking food from the mouths of babes and calling this a “democratic” economic system that promotes “freedom”? Freedom to starve, apparently!

Nearly 49 million Americans live in households that are food insecure. These are our most vulnerable people: 83 percent of food benefits go to households with children, the elderly or people with disabilities.

In the absence of an economic system based on cooperation and economic democracy, at the very least we must protect critical safety net programs like food stamps in the face of those with economic power who are literally willing to let “nonproductive” members of society starve, if it means they can keep their tax breaks and get their corporate welfare. That’s why DSA signed on to the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) letter against cuts.

It’s time to say NO MORE! Send a message to Congress right now! Check FRAC’s list of Senators and Representatives on the committee and call the Capitol switchboard to reach their offices: (202) 224-3121.

 

Data Security for DSA Members

June 27, 2017

Ack! I googled myself and didn't like what I found!

WHAT: A DSA Webinar about "Doxing"
WHEN: 9PM EST, 6PM PST

We're proud of our organizing, and chapter work is transparent for both political and practical reasons. However, there are basic precautions you can take in this time of rapid DSA growth to protect your privacy.

Key Wiki is a website that meticulously documents DSA activity and posts it for the world to see. If you're an active DSA member, likely your name is on their website. This is an example of "doxing".

As DSA becomes larger, more visible, and more powerful, we might expect that more websites like this will pop up, and more of our members' information might be posted publicly on the web.

Join a live webinar on Tuesday, June 27 with data security expert Alison Macrina, to learn:

  1. what is doxing? with examples and ways to prevent it
  2. how to keep your passwords strong and your data secure
  3. where to find your personal info on the internet and how to get it removed
  4. social media best practices for DSA organizers
  5. what to do if you've already been doxed

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/9173276528

Call-in Info: +1 408 638 0968
Meeting ID: 917 327 6528

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 11 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 9 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.