Democratic Left

I Have WAY More Stuff Than You: How Is This Normal, Just, or Right?

Spitz_graphs.jpg
 Quarterly Journal of Economics
Read more
Add your reaction

17 Essential Films for Women's History Month

ironjawH_I110819192524.jpg
Iron Jawed Angels (2004)

By Simone Morgen

In honor of National Women’s History Month and the visual depiction of women’s lives in general, here’s a list of some widely available feature films about women. (Even when based on historical events, these are not documentaries.)

Wild (2014) – The fact that a woman’s journey is a type of story that is more usually devoted to men’s lives by itself qualifies this for inclusion. She hikes the entire Pacific Coast trail in a quest to recover a sense of purpose and direction. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallée.

Iron Jawed Angels (2004) – Alice Paul and the restructuring of 1910s feminism to fight for one of the basic elements of citizenship: voting. Directed by Katja von Garnier.

Erin Brockovich (2000) – The triumph of an ignored and disrespected legal assistant’s campaign to bring justice to victims of industrial pollution, based on actual events. Directed by Steven Soderbergh.

Read more
Add your reaction

Frances Perkins: “The Day the New Deal Was Born”

Frances_Perkins3.jpg
Frances Perkins (Francis Perkins Center)

Courtesy of The Frances Perkins Center

On March 25, 1911, Frances Perkins was having tea with friends in New York City’s Washington Square when the group heard fire engines. Running to the scene of the fire, Frances Perkins witnessed in horror as 47 workers – mostly young women – jumped from the eighth and ninth floors of the building to their deaths on the street below. In all, 146 died as flames engulfed the upper three stories of the building.   The fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory was, she later proclaimed, “the day the New Deal was born.” In response to the fire, a citizen’s Committee on Safety was established to recommend practices to prevent a further tragedy in the city’s factories.

Read more
Add your reaction

Resisting the Criminalization of Homeless Lives

Homeless_edited.jpg
Credit: Paula Lomazzi, Director of Sacramento Homeless Organizing Committee.

By David Roddy

Since December 9, 2014, over 100 of Sacramento’s poor and homeless have lined up every Tuesday for a free organic meal outside the doors of City Hall hosted by the Community Dinner Project, organized by Occupy Sacramento. The food line starts two hours before city council is called to session. Hundreds of Sacramento's poor line the sidewalk in front of City Hall to share a hot meal. Although these dinners take place on city property, the event is not sanctioned by the city government. In fact, it is expressly forbidden.

In October of 2013, the City passed an ordinance requiring all community groups to obtain a permit before sharing food with the homeless. The Community Dinner Project addresses this and other community issues by providing a hot meal and an environment for discussion. Participants are then encouraged to attend the city council meeting and speak during public comment.

Read more
Add your reaction

Don’t Tax and Don’t Spend: How the Right Defunded the Government

tax_protest_policy_government_sign_iStock_3x4_1-400x300.jpg
Protesters attend a tax demonstration in Texas. Credit: today.mccombs.utexas.edu.

By Maria Svart

The spring issue of Democratic Left arrives before Tax Day, April 15. As socialists, we know how important a fair and progressive tax system is to a fair and progressive society. It’s important, then, that we understand how, for more than 30 years, the right wing has worked to lower taxes for the rich and use the reduced income as an excuse to starve government programs that benefit all of us.

We know that candidates for office consider it political suicide to talk about raising taxes, even on the rich, but it is a complete myth that U.S. income taxes are too high. The truth is that the United States is both the lowest and most regressively taxed nation in the developed world. We spend less of our collective income on public provision than any other advanced democracy. On the other hand, we do excel in spending in two areas that violently destroy rather than enhance human life: the military and mass incarceration. 

Read more
Add your reaction

Remembering Other Dreams: (Sign) Language Access & Empowerment

We_still_have_a_dream.png

Students and supporters march on Capitol Hill in protest for the first Deaf president of Gallaudet University carrying the banner (on loan from the Crispus Attucks museum) used in the 1988 protests to declare Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a national holiday. (Gallaudet University Archives)

By Natasha Abner 

Thirty-seven years ago, students, faculty, alumni, and supporters of Gallaudet University — the only university for the deaf in the world — put Deaf awareness on the national and international agenda. (Capitalization of "Deaf" is used to represent its status as a cultural identity; lowercase "deaf" indicates the physical trait of deafness.) Gallaudet protestors had closed down the campus and taken to the streets of Washington, D.C., to fight for their own self representation: a Deaf president of their university, the first in its 124 year history. Still images splashed across newspapers and nightly newscasts of the protestors chanting in American Sign Language "deaf president now," using the convention of representing signs in capitalized English orthography.

Read more
1 reaction

Democratic Left: Spring 2015

You can now read the latest issue of Democratic Left Magazine in its entirety online. Just click on the cover below to download our Spring 2015 issue. To receive a copy of Democratic Left Magazine in the mail, join DSA today.

DL_Spring_2015.green_cover.png

The Legend of Lucy Parsons

 

Lucy_Gonzalez.jpg
 IWW Poster (IWW/Political Posters)

By Dolores Delgado Campbell

Many Mexican-American/Chicana women have been involved in labor organizing, but their activities have not been well documented by a white, male dominated history profession. One such leader was Lucia Gonzalez Parsons.

Lucia Gonzalez Parsons was born in Johnson County Texas in 1852, and married Albert R. Parsons in 1871. During her lifetime Lucia was a seamstress, a wife, a mother of two-children, a socialist, a labor organizer and a writer.

She was an editor and a contributor to the Alarm, the paper of the Working Peoples Association.  Along with her husband Albert Parsons, (the Haymarket Square martyr) she was active in radical politics in Chicago.  She wrote articles, made stirring speeches, and led numerous protests for workers’ rights in the struggle for the eight-hour day.

Read more
1 reaction
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9    42  43  Next →

Upcoming Events

Ain't Scared of Your Jails

April 08, 2015
conference call - RSVP for call-in information
Femi_Ferguson.jpg
 
47 years ago this April, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated while supporting striking Memphis sanitation workers.
 
Please join us this April for Ain't Scared of Your Jails: Lessons for Today from Racial Justice History, a national DSA conference call to discuss non-violent direct action organizing from the 1960s voting rights movement and lessons for anti-police brutality activism today.
 
Who:
Femi Agbabiaka, Chicago DSA, YDS Coordinating Committee
Duane Campbell, Sacramento DSA
Jack Suria Linares, Hamilton College YDS
Maria Svart, DSA National Director
 
What:
Facilitated discussion of the one hour segment “Ain’t Scared of Your Jails: 1960-61” from the Eyes on the Prize documentary series and lessons for racial justice activism today, after remarks from DSAers about their current work.
 
How:
Step 1: Register online to RSVP below and get the conference call information via email;
Step 2: We'll email you a link to watch the 1-hour film online, on your own time, before the call;
Step 3: Call in to the conference call and hear from DSA speakers, then discuss their remarks and the documentary with other DSA members from across the country!

Organized by the DSA Anti-Racism Working Group.
 
NYCOct222014-1.jpg
Share