Chinese Students and Workers Confront Global Capitalism

We can grasp the dynamics of contemporary global capitalism through the prism of Foxconn. Nearly a million young Chinese workers assemble over 50 percent of all the electronics products consumed on the globe at 30 of its factories in China. In those massive production complexes armies of young men and women perform monotonous repetitive assembly tasks under quasi-military discipline 60 hours a week for minimal pay.

Foxconn, controlled by Taiwanese billionaire Terry Gou, is China’s largest exporter and 60th largest global corporation, with annual revenues of $79 billion (2010). Its largest corporate customer is Apple, whose iPhones and iPads it manufactures, but most other major global electronics companies also contract Foxconn for their final assembly tasks. Sophisticated components and parts are manufactured in Korea, Japan, Europe and the USA, shipped to China for final assembly, and then re-exported for sale to more affluent consumers in North America, Europe and Japan. About $5 of the cost of an iPhone or iPad pays the wages of the Chinese workers who assemble them, while another $5 goes to Foxconn executives and shareholders. The rest goes to the manufacturers of sophisticated components and to Apple’s gross profits, currently about 36 percent of gross revenues.

Foxconn is a linchpin of the most profitable sector of global capital. Although its own operating profit margins are razor-thin, shaved by the constant cost-squeezing of Apple and other corporate customers, Foxconn has made itself indispensable to global capital by fully utilizing its strategic position in China.

Foxconn first constructed two massive factory/dormitory complexes with half a million workers in China’s first export- processing “free trade” zone in Shenzhen. After living costs soared in Chinese coastal cities and a wave of despairing Foxconn workers hurled themselves from windows of its high-rise dormitories, Foxconn sought sites in interior Chinese cities, where workers living closer to their home villages could be paid lower wages than in Shenzhen. To help Foxconn cope with the breakneck pace demanded by Apple to supply its latest lines of iPhones and iPads, provincial political authorities scrambled to enlarge airports and roads, distribute tax breaks, and facilitate the construction of new factory/ housing complexes in Chengdu and Chongqing, Zhengzhou and Taiyuan. Local authorities help Foxconn recruit hundreds of thousands of new assembly workers, plus thousands of industrial engineers pouring out of vocational schools.

The most “flexible” workers employed by Foxconn are “student interns” between 16 and 18 years old (and occasionally as young as 14) supplied to Foxconn by vocational schools. Thousands of “student interns” are assigned to work long hours at various mind-numbing repetitive tasks at Foxconn factories regardless of their

major field of study. Those who try to escape these harsh conditions are warned that they will not receive their school diplomas if they leave. Although they receive a minimum wage (and no benefits at all since they are not covered by labor law), many student interns actually are forced to pay for the privilege of being exploited by paying tuition and placement fees to their schools.

Data Security for DSA Members

June 27, 2017

Ack! I googled myself and didn't like what I found!

WHAT: A DSA Webinar about "Doxing"
WHEN: 9PM EST, 6PM PST

We're proud of our organizing, and chapter work is transparent for both political and practical reasons. However, there are basic precautions you can take in this time of rapid DSA growth to protect your privacy.

Key Wiki is a website that meticulously documents DSA activity and posts it for the world to see. If you're an active DSA member, likely your name is on their website. This is an example of "doxing".

As DSA becomes larger, more visible, and more powerful, we might expect that more websites like this will pop up, and more of our members' information might be posted publicly on the web.

Join a live webinar on Tuesday, June 27 with data security expert Alison Macrina, to learn:

  1. what is doxing? with examples and ways to prevent it
  2. how to keep your passwords strong and your data secure
  3. where to find your personal info on the internet and how to get it removed
  4. social media best practices for DSA organizers
  5. what to do if you've already been doxed

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/9173276528

Call-in Info: +1 408 638 0968
Meeting ID: 917 327 6528

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 11 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 9 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.