Chinese Students and Workers Confront Global Capitalism

We can grasp the dynamics of contemporary global capitalism through the prism of Foxconn. Nearly a million young Chinese workers assemble over 50 percent of all the electronics products consumed on the globe at 30 of its factories in China. In those massive production complexes armies of young men and women perform monotonous repetitive assembly tasks under quasi-military discipline 60 hours a week for minimal pay.

Foxconn, controlled by Taiwanese billionaire Terry Gou, is China’s largest exporter and 60th largest global corporation, with annual revenues of $79 billion (2010). Its largest corporate customer is Apple, whose iPhones and iPads it manufactures, but most other major global electronics companies also contract Foxconn for their final assembly tasks. Sophisticated components and parts are manufactured in Korea, Japan, Europe and the USA, shipped to China for final assembly, and then re-exported for sale to more affluent consumers in North America, Europe and Japan. About $5 of the cost of an iPhone or iPad pays the wages of the Chinese workers who assemble them, while another $5 goes to Foxconn executives and shareholders. The rest goes to the manufacturers of sophisticated components and to Apple’s gross profits, currently about 36 percent of gross revenues.

Foxconn is a linchpin of the most profitable sector of global capital. Although its own operating profit margins are razor-thin, shaved by the constant cost-squeezing of Apple and other corporate customers, Foxconn has made itself indispensable to global capital by fully utilizing its strategic position in China.

Foxconn first constructed two massive factory/dormitory complexes with half a million workers in China’s first export- processing “free trade” zone in Shenzhen. After living costs soared in Chinese coastal cities and a wave of despairing Foxconn workers hurled themselves from windows of its high-rise dormitories, Foxconn sought sites in interior Chinese cities, where workers living closer to their home villages could be paid lower wages than in Shenzhen. To help Foxconn cope with the breakneck pace demanded by Apple to supply its latest lines of iPhones and iPads, provincial political authorities scrambled to enlarge airports and roads, distribute tax breaks, and facilitate the construction of new factory/ housing complexes in Chengdu and Chongqing, Zhengzhou and Taiyuan. Local authorities help Foxconn recruit hundreds of thousands of new assembly workers, plus thousands of industrial engineers pouring out of vocational schools.

The most “flexible” workers employed by Foxconn are “student interns” between 16 and 18 years old (and occasionally as young as 14) supplied to Foxconn by vocational schools. Thousands of “student interns” are assigned to work long hours at various mind-numbing repetitive tasks at Foxconn factories regardless of their

major field of study. Those who try to escape these harsh conditions are warned that they will not receive their school diplomas if they leave. Although they receive a minimum wage (and no benefits at all since they are not covered by labor law), many student interns actually are forced to pay for the privilege of being exploited by paying tuition and placement fees to their schools.


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Starting a Local Chapter from Scratch (9pm Eastern)

October 04, 2016 · 8 rsvps
Webinar, RSVP required for sign in information

So you are now a member of DSA, but there is no local chapter where you live. You are thinking of starting a local chapter, but you're not quite sure how to do it.

In Starting a Local Chapter from Scratch you will learn:

  • how other locals got started in recent years
  • how to find out who is already a member
  • the importance of a comrade
  • how to recruit new members
  • the importance of a mentor
  • how to become a recognized organizing committee
  • how to become a chartered local
  • what works best to bring new people in.

Join us for our latest organizing training for democratic socialist activists: DSA’s (Virtual) Little Red Schoolhouse.

Instructor:

  • Steve Max, DSA Vice Chair and one of the founders of the legendary community organizing school, The Midwest Academy

Training Details:

  1. Workshops are free for any DSA member in good standing.
  2. You need a computer with good internet access.
  3. Your computer must have preferably headphones or else speakers; you can speak thru a mic or use chat to "speak".
  4. If you have questions, contact Theresa Alt talt@igc.org 607-280-7649.
  5. If you have very technical questions, contact Tony Schmitt schmittaj@gmail.com 608-355-6568.
  6. You can participate in every webinar or just attend once in a while.
  7. Workshops will generally be on weekends or evenings.
  8. Participation requires that you register at least 45 hours in advance -- by midnight Sunday for Tuesday's webinar.

NOTE: This training is scheduled for 9:00pm Eastern Time (8pm Central, 7pm Mountain, 6pm Pacific, 5pm Alaska, 3 pm Hawaii).

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DSA New Member Orientation Call

October 19, 2016 · 22 rsvps
DSA New Member Orientation

You've joined DSA - Great. Now register for this New Member Orientation call and find out more about our politics and our vision.  And, most importantly, how you can become involved.  8 PM ET; 7 PM CT; 6 PM MT; 5 PM PT.

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