Calling In and Showing Up

Five Steps to Being an Effective Ally

As socialists, we believe in solidarity. We know that an injury to one is an injury to all. But how do we practice solidarity in our everyday lives and in our campaigns? If you’ve ever wondered why your local chapter only attracts a certain kind of person, ask yourself how you can become a better ally to the people you want to work with. The DSA National Office, with the Young Democratic Socialists, is field-testing a workshop to help members of locals become better allies so that we can build a stronger movement to change oppressive institutions and social structures. What follows is a brief outline of the steps you can take on your own or in a group to begin the process. If you want to follow up with a more detailed workshop, get in touch with the National Office.

Pick any identity group to which you do not belong and try the following:

Self-reflect: What thoughts or prejudices might you have regarding an unfamiliar identity or issue? Admitting ignorance or prejudice on an issue or experience is an important step toward being a good ally.

Self-educate: Take the initiative and search for books, media channels, articles and blogs written by people with different voices. It’s not up to oppressed people to educate you, although some may be willing to do so at the right time and in the right place. Find out where you can learn about alternative viewpoints on the radicalized history of the United States. Whichever route you take, at this point it’s important to listen most of the time.

Get active: The best way to be an ally is to show up. Taking part in coalition work and public actions like marches, rallies, and boycotts directed at fighting oppression and discrimination is critical. Movements always benefit from added voices and bodies. Ask what the group needs from you. You can lend additional support by organizing others like yourself to join the action, too. Be sure to practice listening in these settings as well. This means keeping an open mind, not just thinking about what you’ll say next.

Lead by example: Not everyone is politically correct or sensitive to the reactions of others around them, but a strong ally stops oppressive behavior in its tracks. Do your best to stop oppressive language and discriminatory practices in group settings as well as in one-on-one conversations. Developing new group practices when facilitating meetings, such as progressive stack, which means that the people who usually hold back get to speak first, goes a long way toward making sure everyone’s voice gets heard. Encourage others to speak up when they hear something that makes others uncomfortable, and stop harmful behavior or language immediately. Remember, if such an incident occurs, don’t call out, call in! People’s mistakes are not an opportunity to shame them in front of others. Reach out to them in private after a meeting or in a private conversation, and calmly explain to them why what they did or said was harmful. Doing this will help individual groups improve the culture of the group.

Take risks, learn, and keep going: No one can be a perfect ally overnight. Self-reflection, self-education, and self-correction take practice and persistence. When speaking up you may find yourself in a position where you yourself are called in. Assume good faith on the part of those who are calling you in. They want you as their ally. Listen carefully to constructive criticism and avoid being defensive, especially when this criticism is coming from a comrade. Together, we can learn to accept and celebrate each others’ differences and develop a culture of acceptance everywhere. Being allies is key to creating a truly powerful organization.

Betsy_Avila.jpg

Betsy Avila is the Young Democratic Socialists organizer.

This article originally appeared in the summer 2015 issue of the Democratic Left magazine.

 

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership. Democratic Left blog post submission guidelines can be found here.

 

Introduction to Socialist Feminism Call

April 30, 2017
· 82 rsvps

Join Philadelphia DSA veteran activist Michele Rossi to explore “socialist feminism.” How does it differ from other forms of feminism? How and when did it develop? What does it mean for our activism? 4-5:30pm ET, 3-4:30pm CT, 2-3:30pm MT, 1-2:30pm PT.

DSA Webinar: Talking About Socialism

May 02, 2017
· 47 rsvps

Practice talking about socialism in plain language. Create your own short rap. Prepare for those conversations about socialism that happen when you table in public.

Join us for our latest organizing training for democratic socialist activists: DSA’s (Virtual) Little Red Schoolhouse.

This training is at 9:00pm Eastern, 8:00pm Central, 7:00pm Mountain, 6:00pm Pacific, 5:00pm Alaska, and 3:00pm Hawaii Time. Please RSVP.

Instructor:

Steve Max, DSA Vice Chair and one of the founders of the legendary community organizing school, The Midwest Academy

In Talking About Socialism you will learn to:

  • Have a quick response ready to go next time someone asks you about democratic socialism.
  • Create your own elevator pitch about democratic socialism and DSA.
  • Use your personal experience and story to explain democratic socialism.
  • Think through the most important ideas you want to convey about democratic socialism.
  • Have a concise explanation of what DSA does, for your next DSA table, event or coalition meeting.

Training Details

  • This workshop is for those who have already had an introduction to democratic socialism, whether from DSA's webinar or from other sources.
  • If you have a computer with microphone, speakers and good internet access, you can join via internet for free.
  • If you have questions, contact Theresa Alt <talt@igc.org> 607-280-7649.
  • If you have very technical questions, contact Tony Schmitt <schmittaj@gmail.com> 608-335-6568.
  • Participation requires that you register at least 45 hours in advance, by midnight Sunday.

 

Film Discussion: The Free State of Jones

June 11, 2017
· 19 rsvps

Join Victoria Bynum, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History, Texas State University, San Marcos, to discuss The Free State of Jones. STX Entertainment bought the film rights to Bynum's book of the same title. She also served as a consultant and appears in a cameo scene. What was the Free State of Jones? During the Civil War, an armed band of deserters led by Newt Knight, a non-slaveholding white farmer, took to the swamps of southeastern Mississippi and battled against the Confederacy in an uprising popularly known as “The Free State of Jones.” Joining Newt in this rebellion was Rachel, a slave. From their relationship, there developed a controversial mixed-race community that endured long after the Civil War had ended. View the film here for $6 before the discussion. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.