Anthony Hill, Black Lives Matter, and DSA

Hill_vigil_Lorraine.jpg
Community members attend a vigil for Anthony Hill last spring. Credit: Metro Atlanta DSA

By Adam Cardo

I first became involved with DSA in the fall of 2014, as part of my larger political realignment brought on by the Black Lives Matter movement. After spending the summer volunteering for a moderate Democrat in Georgia, I began a semester at American University in Washington, D.C., taking classes while interning for another moderate Democrat. Fully enmeshed in mainstream “progressive” politics, I was all set to become a neoliberal Democratic Party apparatchik. However, two events transpired to lead me to the socialist light. The first was my involvement with the Metro Washington, D.C. DSA chapter, which I discovered through a mutual acquaintance. The other crucial event was the non-indictment of the police officers who murdered Eric Garner. The murder and rise of the Black Lives Matter movement brought into focus the entrenched racism that formed the bedrock of the U.S. society and economic system, the critical link between capitalist exploitation and white supremacy and the need for a total replacement of capitalism with socialism to create a better world.

After returning to Georgia, I quickly joined the Metro Atlanta DSA chapter, which was already involved with local Black Lives Matter groups. Besides solidarity with the events in Ferguson and Baltimore, Atlanta BLM activism mostly centered around the murder of Anthony Hill. Anthony Hill was a 27-year-old African-American Air Force veteran whose bipolar disorder was exasperated by his deployment overseas.  During a psychotic episode, a naked Hill was shot and killed outside his apartment by DeKalb County Police officer Robert Olson in March of 2015.  Local activist groups who led the protest included Rise Up Georgia and #It'sBiggerThanYou, as well as myself and several fellow Atlanta DSA members. After an initial protest outside Hill's neighborhood, activists focused their efforts on securing an indictment of the accused officer with marches and rallies. The struggle culminated in a campout outside the DeKalb County courthouse during the week of January 17, when the officer was successfully indicted on all six counts against him.

The events surrounding Anthony Hill show the power of Black Lives Matter in countering the racial policing that predominates in the United States, while connecting it to the larger white supremacy that pervades our culture. However, we must be aware of the time and resources required for such a struggle. That a campout was needed to secure even the limited victory of potentially finding a police officer guilty shows how much time and energy these fights require. This is especially true in Georgia, where legal protections for officers are considered the most extensive in the nation. In the case of a grand jury, Georgia law gives accused officers access to the grand jury’s meeting, as well as the opportunity to address the panel without the threat of cross-examination or a rebuttal by prosecutors.

Bringing all these lessons together, it is critical for DSA to aid the Black Lives Matter movement in their struggle. Since outside mass struggle is the critical factor in securing legal victories (albeit minor ones), it is important for DSA locals to aid local Black Lives Matter-affiliated groups with grassroots organizing and mobilization. Even things as simple as phone banking for small, local events can have huge impacts on the momentum surrounding campaigns. DSA has a huge opportunity to connect with newly radicalized people of color, and it is an opportunity we can not pass up.

If you want to work more around the Black Lives Matter movement and other anti-racism work, you can become a part of the DSA Anti-Racism Working Group by emailing me at acardo1120@gmail.com.

Adam Cardo is the President of Emory University Young Democratic Socialists and a member of Metro Atlanta Democratic Socialists of America.

Individually signed posts do not necessarily reflect the views of DSA as an organization or its leadership. Democratic Left blog post submission guidelines can be found here.

Data Security for DSA Members

June 27, 2017

Ack! I googled myself and didn't like what I found!

WHAT: A DSA Webinar about "Doxing"
WHEN: 9PM EST, 6PM PST

We're proud of our organizing, and chapter work is transparent for both political and practical reasons. However, there are basic precautions you can take in this time of rapid DSA growth to protect your privacy.

Key Wiki is a website that meticulously documents DSA activity and posts it for the world to see. If you're an active DSA member, likely your name is on their website. This is an example of "doxing".

As DSA becomes larger, more visible, and more powerful, we might expect that more websites like this will pop up, and more of our members' information might be posted publicly on the web.

Join a live webinar on Tuesday, June 27 with data security expert Alison Macrina, to learn:

  1. what is doxing? with examples and ways to prevent it
  2. how to keep your passwords strong and your data secure
  3. where to find your personal info on the internet and how to get it removed
  4. social media best practices for DSA organizers
  5. what to do if you've already been doxed

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/9173276528

Call-in Info: +1 408 638 0968
Meeting ID: 917 327 6528

Film Discussion: Pride

September 10, 2017
· 11 rsvps

Join DSA members Eric Brasure and Brendan Hamill to discuss the British film Pride (2014). It’s 1984, British coal miners are on strike, and a group of gays and lesbians in London bring the queer community together to support the miners in their fight. Based on the true story of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The film is available for rent on YouTube, Amazon, and iTunes. 8 ET/7 CT/6 MT/5 PT.

Film Discussion: Union Maids

September 24, 2017
· 9 rsvps

 

Join DSA member and labor historian Susan Hirsch in discussing Union Maids (1976). Nominated for an Academy Award, this documentary follows three Chicago labor organizers (Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki, and Sylvia Woods) active beginning in the 1930s. The filmmakers were members of the New American Movement (a precursor of DSA), and the late Vicki Starr (aka Stella Nowicki) was a longtime member of Chicago DSA and the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. It’s available free on YouTube, though sound quality is poor. 8ET/7CT/6MT/5PT.